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Matsuda, K. Sawada, and C. Hayashi, Drag on a gravitating sphere moving through a gas, Progr. Taneda, S. Japan , 11 , —, Tanga, P. Babiano, B. Dubrulle, and A. Provenzale, Forming planetesimals in vortices, Icarus , , —, Weidenschilling, S. Levy and J.


  1. 1. Introduction.
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Lunine, pp. Wetherill, G. Wurm, G. Blum, and J. Colwell, A new mechanism relevant to the formation of planetesimals in the solar nebula, Icarus , , —, a. Colwell, Aerodynamical sticking of dust aggregates, Phys. Youdin, A. Shu, Planetesimal formation by gravitational instability, Astrophys. Download references. Correspondence to Minoru Sekiya.

Reprints and Permissions. Search all SpringerOpen articles Search. Article Open Access Published: 20 June Were planetesimals formed by dust accretion in the solar nebula? Abstract The growth of meter-sized bodies in the solar nebula by dust accretion is examined. References Adachi, I. Article Google Scholar Barge, P. Google Scholar Blum, J. Article Google Scholar Blum, J.


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    Article Google Scholar Chavanis, P. Google Scholar Coradini, A. Google Scholar Cuzzi, J. Article Google Scholar Dominik, C. Article Google Scholar Gammie, C. Article Google Scholar Godon, P. Article Google Scholar Goldburg, A. Article Google Scholar Goldreich, P. Article Google Scholar Hayashi, C. Google Scholar Heim, L. Article Google Scholar Ishitsu, N.

    Article Google Scholar Klahr, H. Article Google Scholar Lee, S. Article Google Scholar Magarvey, R. Article Google Scholar Marcos, C. Article Google Scholar Nakagawa, Y. Bodenheimer, Turbulence in accretion disks: Vorticity generation and angular momentum transport via the global baroclinic instability, Astrophys.

    Lee, S. Fluids , 29 , —, Magarvey, R. Bishop, Transition ranges for three-dimensional wakes, Can. Marcos, C. Barge, The effect of long-lived vortical circulation on the dynamics of dust particles in the mid-plane of a protoplanetary disc, Mon.

    Formation and evolution of planets

    Nakagawa, Y. Sekiya, and C. Hayashi, Settling and growth of dust particles in a laminar phase of a low-mass solar nebula, Icarus , 67 , —, Nakamura, I. Fluids , 19 , 5—8, Poppe, T. Blum, and T. Henning, Analogous experiments on the stickiness of micron-sized preplanetary dust, Astrophys. Rimon, Y. Cheng, Numerical solution of a uniform flow over a sphere at intermediate Reynolds numbers, Phys. Fluids , 12 , —, Safronov, V. F ], Sekiya, M. Shu, F. Johnstone, and D. Hollenbach, Photoevaporation of the solar nebula and the formation of the giant planets, Icarus , , 92—, Takeda, H.

    Matsuda, K. Sawada, and C.

    References

    Hayashi, Drag on a gravitating sphere moving through a gas, Progr. Taneda, S. Japan , 11 , —, Tanga, P. Babiano, B.

    Planetensysteme

    Dubrulle, and A. Provenzale, Forming planetesimals in vortices, Icarus , , —, Weidenschilling, S. Levy and J. Lunine, pp. Wetherill, G. Wurm, G. Blum, and J. Colwell, A new mechanism relevant to the formation of planetesimals in the solar nebula, Icarus , , —, a. Colwell, Aerodynamical sticking of dust aggregates, Phys. Youdin, A. Shu, Planetesimal formation by gravitational instability, Astrophys. Download references. Correspondence to Minoru Sekiya.

    chapter and author info

    Reprints and Permissions. Within 50 million years, the pressure and density of hydrogen in the center of the protostar became great enough for it to begin thermonuclear fusion. The temperature, reaction rate, pressure, and density increased until hydrostatic equilibrium was achieved. At this point, the Sun became a main-sequence star. Solar wind from the Sun created the heliosphere and swept away the remaining gas and dust from the protoplanetary disc into interstellar space, ending the planetary formation process.

    The idea that the Solar System originated from a nebula was first proposed in by Swedish scientist and theologian Emanual Swedenborg. In this treatise, he argued that gaseous clouds nebulae slowly rotate, gradually collapsing and flattening due to gravity and forming stars and planets. A similar but smaller and more detailed model was proposed by Pierre-Simon Laplace in his treatise Exposition du system du monde Exposition of the system of the world , which he released in As the cloud spun more rapidly, it threw off material that eventually condensed to form the planets.

    The Laplacian nebular model was widely accepted during the 19th century, but it had some rather pronounced difficulties. The main issue was angular momentum distribution between the Sun and planets, which the nebular model could not explain. In addition, Scottish scientist James Clerk Maxwell — asserted that different rotational velocities between the inner and outer parts of a ring could not allow for condensation of material.